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Q&A with Temple Grandin
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The moral of Dr. Pepperberg’s story, and the reason she finally succeeded where others had failed, was that she was the first person to consider that maybe it was the researchers’ fault that birds weren’t learning anything, not the birds’. She went beyond classical behaviorism and operant conditioning; she tried a different branch of behaviorism called social modeling theory. It is the way real people and real animals learn in the real world.

Just think of wolves. How could they learn to hunt if they didn’t observe it? The ultimate goal is to get food, but how to find the food? You have to first learn that it is food. They don’t know that the prey is food. Hunting is a predatory instinct, but you have to learn what you eat, and you learn that from Mother. You learn from observation.

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This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 29: Winter 2004
Claudia Kawczynska is The Bark's co-founder and editor in chief. thebark.com

 Photo of Temple Grandin © Joel Benjamin, courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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