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Dog Is My Co-Pilot
Bark Readers’ Travel Tips 2014
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Dogs Jumping out of Car

Our call went out … and you’ve responded! Each year, The Bark asks our readers to share their travel expertise—naming their favorite destinations, canine-friendly accommodations and tips for sharing the road, trail or skies with their dogs. And who better to guide us in our summer adventures than Bark readers? Our trusted readers are road-tested and trail-proven, and once again have offered up a trove of off-beaten-paths, can’t miss favorites and invaluable tips to make your next trip one to remember.

We kick things off with a few suggestions from The Bark staff …

As tempting as it is to order that gourmet dog meal from room service—New Zealand venison, garden vegetables over quinoa—may prove a tad exotic for your dog’s stomach. Stick to your regular feeding plan … the last thing you want at a four-paw hotel is an upset stomach.
—Claudia Kawczynska, Editor-in-Chief, The Bark

Be sure to check with the hotel, campsite, even a city on the restrictions imposed on dog size or breed. Many hotels refuse dogs over a certain weight, limiting their “dog-friendly” policy to very small dogs. Other accommodations, including some campgrounds, ban selected breeds—Rottweilers, Dobermans, and Pit Bulls (and their mixes) are the most common targets. Do your homework!
—Marie Muscolino, Social Media Manager, The Bark

We check local dog activities on meetup.com and other social media groups to find play groups or hikes when we arrive at a new destination. If we’re staying in an area for a few days, it gives us an opportunity to meet local dog lovers and see sights we’d probably miss otherwise.
—Daniela Lopez, Customer Service Manager, The Bark

Summer is our big hiking and camping time, unfortunately it’s tick season too. There’s a good selection of repellents available, but if you find a tick on your dog (or yourself), know that a tick has to be embedded for 24 to 48 hours to spread infection—still, the sooner removed, the better!
—Susan Tasaki, Editor, The Bark

And now from The Bark readers …

Our favorite hang out is the sand dunes on Oregon’s Adventure Coast: Coos Bay! The dunes also stretch for many miles, from North Bend to Florence, about 45 miles, so choose your 'off-beaten' path and head out. We LOVE it here!
Liz Dodge

Bigfork, Montana has it all—rivers, lakes, miles of hiking trails, plus a great Western village setting. Spectacular views too. Plus in Idaho, the gorgeous Lake Pend Oreille near Coeur d’Alene, lots of good day hikes nearby too.
Dog About Town Northwest

Getting out of the heat of the Arizona Desert by camping all summer long in our vintage Airstream trailer. But, especially on the coast of Baja, Mexico, where the waves lap softly and the water is cool but not frigid.
Judith Mariahazy

The Adirondacks’ Saranac Lake, New York. We made a 4½ hour drive just so our dog could swim in the lake. It was a very safe place for all of us to swim together. When we wanted to swim as a family, we went there.
Lu Frazier

Hunt Country Vineyards on Keuka Lake in the Finger Lakes (New York) does a day in June where you can bring your dog and hike around their vineyards. Afterwards there is a wine tasting.
Dawn Lammert

We found the panhandle of Florida, Cape San Blas, Port Saint Joe, to be extremely dog friendly and great beaches to walk, and run on. Local restaurants were also very accommodating too.
James Doorey

Bandit, travels with me everywhere, but one of the most interesting places I've taken him is Fantastic Caverns, Missouri. It was actually discovered by a farmer’s dog who had crawled through its hidden entrance and now its caves have jeep-drawn tram tours. It’s very pet friendly—with a special fondness for dogs because of the significance a dog played in the discovery.
MaryLou Robinson

On the edge of Alaska’s The Gates of the Arctic National Park … The huge blue sky watched over us while the surrounding mountains wrapped us in their loose embrace and Cedar got to roll joyfully in fox urine, carry around a mummified squirrel and sniff wolf scat! We were all ecstatic!
Connie Page

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Submitted by Kezia Slaughter | April 30 2014 |

Visit the Westcrest Off-leash dog park in West Seattle.

Submitted by Tracey Powers | April 30 2014 |

Chase Belgrade Lakes, ME beautiful spot with lots of hiking and a great golf course

Submitted by Maeve | May 8 2014 |

My brother gave me a great suggestion last year as I went through a difficult first holiday travel season with my new dog (it was the first significant car rides he'd been through with me and he did not love it). If you're doing a long day of driving, scout the route for dog parks or state parks that allow dogs and plan a breather of an hour or so to let your dog decompress and get the crazies out. I found one for the drive home, but it was a members only run. However, a local who was using the run suggested that for future travel, if I sent the park proof of vax and license info, they can issue a temporary code to use when I pass through. My hound still appreciated a nice walk around an area that wasn't a noisy truck stop or gas station.

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