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Dog Hoarders
What is animal hoarding? Who becomes a hoarder?
Horders

 

* “Long-term Outcomes in Animal Hoarding Cases,” by Berry, Patronek & Lockwood; Animal Law 11:167.

All case citations taken from Pet-Abuse.com

Whom to Call

You can report suspected hoarding to your local animal control, the humane society, the local public health department, or even a zoning department that regulates unsanitary conditions or the number of animals on a property.

If you are unsure of whom to contact, try your local yellow pages, or go to Aspca.org and search for State Animal Cruelty Laws.

Resources

For complete research articles and other in-depth information and statistics about animal hoarding by Dr. Patronek and others, see the Tufts University Hoarding of Animals Research Consortium (HARC) website.

Pet-Abuse.com is an excellent grassroots cruelty information and reporting site. It collects information on reported and prosecuted cases of cruelty, hoarding and puppy mills.

Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) campaign against hoarding and animal fighting.

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This article first appeared in The Bark,
Issue 61: Sept/Oct 2010
Rebecca Wallick is an attorney and a Bark contributing editor; she and her dogs live in Washington.

Illustration: Brian Stauffer

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